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ANALIZE

NSPM Analize br. 4. - Contents and summaries (Sadržaj i rezimei)

   

 

CONTENTS:

Milan Radulović

Relations Between the State and Religious Communities in Serbia in the Second Half of the 20th Century ..............................5

Slobodan G. Marković

Clericalism in Serbia: Myth or Reality? ...............................15

Saša Gajić

State-Church Relations: Necessities and Limits of " Politizication " .............................29

Branko Radun

Church Betnjeen Scylla and Charybdis ..............................35

Živica Tucić

Ukraine - Intra-Orthodox and Inter-Christian Stumbling Stone .....................47

Slobodan Durmanović

From " nascent state " to doubt in survival of entity .......61

Chronology ..........................................................................................85

Abstracts .............................................................................................103

 

Summaries:

Milan Radulović

Relations Between the State and Religious Communities in Serbia in the Second Half of the 20th Century

The second half of the 20th century reveals the following stages in the relations between the religious communities and the state: the period of terror (1944-1955); the period of control (1956-1986); the period of manipulation (1987-2000); the period of improvisation (2001-2003) and the period of legalization, affirmation and integration (from 2004 onwards). In order to arrange the relations between the state and the church in a modern and democratic manner it is, first of all, necessary for the state to properly legitimize the historical churches and religious communities in Serbia. This means that it has to adopt a law acknowledging these communities as public churches, i.e. public cultural and social systems with autochthonous and irreplaceable role in society.   The new legal position of the churches and religious communities should establish their legal continuity pursuant to the legislation of the Kingdom of Serbia and the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. This would eliminate their legal degradation and reduction to an ordinary association of citizens, NGO or a " private legal person " .

Key words: Serbian Orthodox Church, Christianity, state, church, politics.

Slobodan G. Marković

Clericalism in Serbia: Myth or Reality?

The article examines the existence of clericalism in Serbia. Clericalization in a democratic society must fulfill at least three conditions: the number of the so-called institutional believers must exceed half of its population, there must be a historical tradition of strong clerical spirit and the church as an institution must have sufficient economic and political power to impose itself on the state as an equal or senior partner. The analysis reveals that none of these conditions is fulfilled in Serbia. First, the convinced (and institutional in a proper sense) believers in Serbia account for only 8.5 per cent. Secondly, during the 19 and the 20th centuries the state invariably ruled the church in Serbia, not vice versa. Third, the SPC has never been, nor is it today, a particular economic factor in Serbia. The author therefore concludes that all talk of clericalisation in Serbia is only a political myth.

Key words: Serbian Orthodox Church, Christianity, state, church, politics.

Saša Gajić

State-Church Relations: Necessities and Limits of "Politizication"

In contrast from the state and society as forms of human communities, the church is a spiritual and, in qualitative terms, different community. It exists within the former communities and does not overlap with them but rather surpasses them in its spiritual dimension. The church as a spiritual community does not have a " horizontal " political ideology. But, the substance of the Christian religion gives rise to a specific " political philosophy " of care for society and those living in it. Concerned primarily, but not exclusively, for the spiritual life of its believers, the Church also comments on the burning social and political topics, appealing to the conscience of statesmen and all citizens to find the best answers to the challenges of modernity. And although the members of the Serbian Orthodox Church (people and clergy) include few of those who deeply reflect on wider social phenomena and, most importantly, their spiritual causes and possible consequences, the SPC has in the tragic times for its people remained true to it Christian tradition of " heavenly policy " , with the slogan that politics is but the means and man its ends.

Key words: Serbian Orthodox Church, Christianity, state, church politics.

Branko Radun

Church Between Scylla and Charybdis

The Serbian Orthodox Church has experienced a tragedy and even true martyrdom in mid- 20th century. After the collapse of the socialist order and the disintegration of the state, the SPC has left the margins of history. In the 1987-99 period of his rise to power Slobodan Milošević appeared in public in the company of episcopes and the patriarch. However, after the students protest in 1992 and 1996, the SPC has, with its demand for his resignation and support to integration of the opposition, helped attain the objectives of the democratic opposition. Today, especially in the light of the deconstruction of institution and disillusionment in the " Serbian democracy " lone and marginal voices of the conservative right are heard. They call upon the church to become more directly politically engaged. On the other hand, the left demands from the Church to withdraw to the purely " spiritual " , " liturgical " and humanitarian sphere. This would lead to the ghettoization of the Church from the social reality. The Church can only help itself and the community in general, if it is socially and culturally integrated in the society and manages to cooperate with the state for general benefit, while at the same time keeping its independence from the political sphere.

Key words: Serbian Orthodox Church, Christianity, state, church, politics.

Živica Tucić

Ukraine Intra-Orthodox and Inter-Christian Stumbling Stone

" Ukraine today has as many as ten different and rivaling orthodox churches along with the Uniate and a strong Roman Catholic Church. The Ukraine is believed to be the field of two major battles. The first, between Orthodoxy and Catholicism, is waged because of Vatican's attempts top spread the Uniate model, applied in Ukraine to the entire territory of the Soviet Union and other post-communist countries. The second battle has to do with the aspirations of the Patriarchate of Constantinople to establish its domination among the Orthodox. Constantinople intends to open its representative office in Kiev and Lvov, which leads towards the termination of relations between the patriarchates of Moscow and Constantinople. Constantinople could then count on the " Hellenic bloc " in Orthodoxy, the patriarchates of Alexandria and Jerusalem, the Cypriot and Albanian Churches, as well as the Czeck, Finnish and Romanian churches. The Serbs and Bulgarians they would find any decision difficult. The division in Orthodoxy would be unprecedented.

Key words: Patriarchate of Moscow, Patriarchate of Constantinople, Uniate Church, Vatican.

Slobodan Durmanović

Republika Srpska: From "nascent state" to doubt in survival of entity

In this paper, written on the occasion of tenth anniversary of signing Dayton Agreement, author portraits evolution of post-deytonian Bosnia and Herzegovina, with special emphasis on creation of Republika Srpska. Author shows how pressure inflicted by international community, on one hand, and the burden of conflict between Serbs themselves and calculations of Serb political actors on the other continuously, during several years, derogated and suspended institutions in Republika Srpska. Because all of that, Republika Srpska, initially para-state creation iz confederal Bosnia, became autonomous region within federal Bosnia and Herzegovina with no certain future even in that reduced form.

Key words: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Dayton Agreement, entity, Republika Srpska

 
     
     
 
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